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Title: Hybrid Sharks
Description: Hybrid Sharks found off Australia


lycosids - January 3, 2012 12:58 PM (GMT)
Greetings gentlemen,
Here's starting off my first post this new year with yet another interesting article showing us just how little we understand the natural world and that there are indeed stranger creatures in Heaven and Earth than we can ever imagine!

Warm regards and many thanks,
Javed Jameer Ahmed.

Link: Hybrid Sharks off Australia


P.S: And here's wishing everyone on these forums a very happy and prosperous new years eve. May the almighty bless and keep all of you safe, granting you success in all your future endeavours.

:maggot: :maggot: :maggot:

Rasec Wizzlbang - January 3, 2012 07:18 PM (GMT)
The sharks way of saying 'fuck you guys, we're not going anywhere'.

MartyParty - January 4, 2012 05:05 AM (GMT)
While interesting nonetheless, both species are still essentially black-tip sharks. If I knew how distantly related the Australian subspecies was compared to it's populous relative, then it would be more amazing.

BeetleBob - January 4, 2012 07:27 AM (GMT)
QUOTE
They are a cross between two related but genetically different species.


They're different species. This is actually really important news because different species usually don't interbreed. USUALLY. Actually hybridization is very "big" in birds, where the barriers to hybridization are weaker.
The reason why hybrids usually aren't created is because most species are extremely well tuned to their environment as it is. When a hybrid is created and is viable it's a big deal because that's the first step to a very fast track of evolution!

Woodsy - February 2, 2012 01:52 AM (GMT)
It is only a matter of time, guys.
http://www.fearnet.com/eol_images/Entire_S.../sharktopus.gif]http://www.fearnet.com/eol_images/Entire_S.../sharktopus.gif

Shadgrimgrvy - February 2, 2012 05:54 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (BeetleBob @ Jan 4 2012, 07:27 AM)

They're different species. This is actually really important news because different species usually don't interbreed. USUALLY. Actually hybridization is very "big" in birds, where the barriers to hybridization are weaker.
The reason why hybrids usually aren't created is because most species are extremely well tuned to their environment as it is. When a hybrid is created and is viable it's a big deal because that's the first step to a very fast track of evolution!

I've never heard this before, why do birds interbreed more often?

Also, hybrid tiger shark/great white/hammer head/centipede, I'm calling it now. You heard it here first.

Rasec Wizzlbang - February 2, 2012 06:17 AM (GMT)
A lot of hybrids living in the wild tend to be invasive species, I notice. Through hybridization they become better adapted to the ecosystems they're alien to.

There's a flock of wild hybrid parrots that live in my neighborhood that have been thriving, despite how cold it can get around here. (northern california)

I think birds more readily hybridize because they can fly. The ability to fly and separate probably creates many many closely related species which can still crossbreed.

And for the most part, many species of bird don't differ too much in mating habits. Songs, nests, and sometimes funny dances are something a lot of them do.


I'm pulling this all out of my ass, of course, so don't quote me on it.

Woodsy - February 2, 2012 10:58 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Rasec Wizzlbang @ Feb 2 2012, 06:17 AM)
I'm pulling this all out of my ass, of course, so don't quote me on it.

That's what the bird was doing after the hybridization.




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