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 How to rapidly improve your chess?
irWietje
Posted: Aug 12 2009, 12:45 PM


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Hi,

I got a book from eendavid titled: Rapid chess improvement. It's written by an amateur who wants to help adults to improve their chess rapidly. If someone is interested: 'Rapid chess improvement' by Michael de la Maza. It's a study plan. He states that 2400 hours would suffice to go from amateur to expert if the time is well spent.. Maybe interesting for some?
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irWietje
Posted: Aug 14 2009, 02:10 PM


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http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews_j...hess_improv.htm

Ok, apparently Silman doesn't like this book. I think he has a point in this review...

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eendavid
Posted: Aug 15 2009, 07:45 AM


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Obviously it's not a book that is worth its money, it doesn't contain any information about chess (but that's what internet is for). Also, I think there are not that many people who believe you can grow to the expert-level without strategic, opening and endgame skills. However, Silman silently neglects de la Maza's most important point. At the lower level, e.g. in my TL games, the games are lost due to blunders. It is not correct to suggest these blunders would not arise if your position was better: I also make those blunders in a comfortable or sort of equal position.

To put it in another way: the Silman thinking technique simply doesn't work for me, because my tactical abilities are not strong enough to not allow tactical considerations as a large part of my thinking time. The way I see (or benefit from) it, de la Maza simply takes an extreme (and obviously overall incorrect, but he does display some points very lucidly) point of view, hoping to motivate players to improve their tactical strength.
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irWietje
Posted: Aug 16 2009, 01:53 PM


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I can agree. But to read the book and only learning that tactics is very important is maybe a bit a waste of effort. I know that. It's like Aneirin said: The difficulty level of your blunders just rises as you get better but it is most often blunders that do the trick. (f.e a +2000 may miss a mate in 7, that could called a blunder too)
I am going to read Silman's Amateur's mind. I feel more confident that it will contain more information..
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