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 Opportunity To Do Comics
kacangpool
Posted: Jan 2 2008, 01:16 PM


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opportunity for those who want a start at comics. many who started at indie have gone mainstream. from matt fraction to brian wood to steven seagle to warren ellis. the same goes for artists, becky cloonan, frank quitely, ivan korday just to name a few.

QUOTE

Attention Indy Creators...

Something just popped up at www.comicspace.com that might interest some of you.

AlternaComics is open for submissions for comics to be distributed exclusively through Wowio. Anyone that's having problems with the whole self-publishing thing, this could be a good opportunity.

You can either try going to this link...

http://www.comicspace.com/alternacomics/bu...27622&pb_page=1

... or, if that doesn't work, go to the comicspace homepage (linked above) and scroll down to the bulletins section.

Good Luck!!!

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valley's_regard
Posted: Jan 2 2008, 01:28 PM


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that sounds interesting
Ill read it when I can, just for curiosity's sake
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kacangpool
Posted: Jan 3 2008, 02:50 AM


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QUOTE (valley's_regard @ Jan 2 2008, 01:28 PM)
that sounds interesting
Ill read it when I can, just for curiosity's sake

there were others earlier, unfortunately the tavern wasn't up yet. i'll keep on posting comics jobs opportunities when i come upon them.
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franshux
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 07:42 PM


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Maybe we could send em Bloodworks once e have a few more issues?
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kacangpool
Posted: Jul 16 2008, 01:14 AM


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QUOTE (franshux @ Jul 15 2008, 07:42 PM)
Maybe we could send em Bloodworks once e have a few more issues?

the moment a story arc of bloodworks is done, we certainly can explore this franshux. we have to check also the technical requirements when submitting pages in.
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franshux
Posted: Jul 17 2008, 11:33 AM


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QUOTE (kacangpool @ Jul 16 2008, 01:14 AM)
QUOTE (franshux @ Jul 15 2008, 07:42 PM)
Maybe we could send em Bloodworks once e have a few more issues?

the moment a story arc of bloodworks is done, we certainly can explore this franshux. we have to check also the technical requirements when submitting pages in.

sigs-char-043.gif
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kacangpool
Posted: Dec 21 2009, 12:57 PM


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BREAKING INTO COMICS THE MARVEL WAY! #1 & 2 (of 2)
Written by C.B. CEBULSKI with BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, CHRIS YOST, MARC GUGGENHEIM, STUART MOORE, MIKE BENSON, KATHRYN
IMMONEN, PETER DAVID, JONATHAN HICKMAN, MIKE CAREY, SIMON SPURRIER, KEVIN GREVIOUX & FRANK TIERI
Penciled by MICHELE BERTILORENZI, PAUL DAVIDSON, SERENA FICCA, DAMION HENDRICKS, CHRISTIAN NAUCK, JOE SUITOR, TOMASSO
BENNATO, THOMAS LABOUROT, MATTEO SCALERA, STEPHEN
THOMPSON, SHAUN TURNBULL & GABRIEL HERNANDEZ WALTA
Cover for issue #1 by MATTEO DE LONGIS
Cover for issue #2 by LOST FISH

Want to know what it takes to break into Marvel Comics like these guys? Then look no further than this two-part book which is a must-have for anyone wanting to be a Comic Book Breakout Star! After traveling the globe and meeting scores of talented illustrators, intrepid writer, editor and talent manager C.B. Cebulski is giving twelve rising star artists the opportunity to do their breakout work at Marvel Comics! But not only will BREAKING INTO COMICS THE MARVEL WAY showcase the work of these up-and-comers, C.B. will also provide an insiderís commentary on how these artists got their work seen and what it was that landed them the gig. And with step-by-step submission information and a sample Marvel Comics script, these books are MUST HAVES for anyone interested in doing their breakout work and breaking into the comics industry!
56 PGS./Rated T+ ...$3.99
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Feral Female
Posted: Dec 22 2009, 03:31 AM


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Wow, thanks KC! Those are some very helpful posts for anyone hoping to break into the comics world!
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kacangpool
Posted: Mar 17 2010, 07:59 AM


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ECCC: Breaking into Comics the Marvel Way
by Jefferson M. Robbins

The Marvel way to break into comics, it appears, is by any way short of being a jerk.

At the Emerald City ComiCon on Sunday, Marvel talent scout C.B. Cebulski rounded up a handful of creators who'd landed at the House of Spidey by one route or another. The panel members on "Breaking Into Comics the Marvel Way" determined that the best method, really, is any combination of hard work, talent, and networking that gets you in the door.

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C.B. Cebulski

"In the end, you're the one making it happen," said Jeff Parker, writer of "Thunderbolts," "Atlas," and "Fall of the Hulks." "There's no magic bullet, there's no one kingmaker. It just doesn't happen that way."

"It helps if you're a pleasant person," said artist Colleen Coover ("Girl Comics," "X-Men: First Class"). "Networking is the thing to do."

"I basically just worked my ass off," said "Runaways" colorist Christina Strain, "and I'm still doing that now."

Each of the panelists -- including Cebulski, who came into mainstream comics as one of Marvel's first manga gurus -- had a story of ferocious work and deprivation that eventually led to a steady gig. All started with personal projects for little or no pay, and circulated on the convention scene until their work and names became known.

"You might detect a common theme here of working your ass off for nothing," Coover said.

Cebulski noted that Marvel hired 144 new talents in 2009. "That's almost three people a week, and there's not a lot of other industries with that kind of record of hiring at this point." But getting paid, in an era when Internet access means art and stories circulate for free or cheap, is less likely.

A portfolio of completed work -- a finished comic -- is the best calling card, all agreed. Far better, anyway, than a raw script, Parker said. "No one will read your script. Don't try to give anybody your script. Even if they take it, they're just gonna trash it later. The only way they're gonna read it is in comics form, because then it's much more digestible."

Panel onlookers accepted that there are few shortcuts to working for the majors, and instead offered questions about process. "I like to draw very cartoony," one visitor said in Q&A, and wondered if that was a handicap in today's market.

"It's not cartoony vs. realistic or whatever," Coover told him. "It's whatever's appropriate to that book."


user posted image

user posted image
Christina Strain and Colleen Coover

"Marvel's open to all kinds of styles," Cebulski said. "There was a particular point, in the Marvel dark days I remember, when a certain someone said, 'We're not doing cartoony anymore.' But Marvel will never tell a guy, 'You can't work here because we don't like your style.' If the art is good and it fits the right project, that person is gonna get work. And hey, we're Disney now, right?"

Writers in the audience wanted to know how to find a good artist. The panel suggested web communities like DigitalWebbing, the Jinxworld and Millarworld comment boards, Facebook art groups and gutterzombie.com. Cons like Emerald City are invaluable. And know the strengths of the artist you're writing for, not to mention your own strengths and weaknesses, they offered.

"You don't want to call shots for the artist," Parker said. "If you can't draw, don't say, 'Use this angle and blah blah blah, and go for this approach.' You have to find an artist you can trust."

For instance, Coover said of Parker, "He doesn't write airplanes into my scripts. He'll write pretty, cute girls going shopping or at the beach."

Marvel and DC to harvest the best talent among the smaller presses and independent creators, panelists said, because they're in a position to do so. Cebulski advised creators to lean on their own original stories and characters, rather than Marvel Universe spinoffs. "Just from a legal standpoint, we cannot read anything you write with Spider-Man in it. It's an unfortunate circumstance of the litigious society we live in."

And don't forget the networking -- carried out with a pleasant demeanor, no expectation of favors and an eye toward developing your work to its highest level.

"Ninety-five percent of the people that work in this industry are good people who love what they do, and we like each other," Parker said. "The other five percent aren't good people, we don't like them, but they're talented."
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kacangpool
Posted: Apr 27 2010, 06:19 PM


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Making Comics with a KICKSTARTER to Your Funds
By Vaneta Rogers

user posted image

The concept is simple. Need $3,000 to fund a comic? Just ask your potential readers to cover those costs up front.

Kickstarter, a one-year-old website based in Brooklyn, allows anyone with a creative idea to ask the public to back the endeavor. Used by filmmakers, journalists, inventors and explorers, Kickstarter is now allowing comic book creators to fund their projects by going to straight to the people who benefit from them.

It's an idea that is working for several comic book creators, and if the site catches on, it has the potential to influence how independent comics are funded and published in the future.

Sound too good to be true?

That's what artist Mitch Gerads thought before he and Scott Dillon, writer and co-owner of Popgunpulp Comics, decided to give Kickstarter a try for their space adventure series, Johnny Recon. The two set a goal of raising $2,000, with a deadline of March 17th.

"It just sounded too smooth, but Scott and I were kind of struggling to print our second issue the way we wanted to, and so we decided to give it a shot," Gerads said. "The rest is history. Awesome, awesome history."

They ended up raising more than $3,000.

Word of their success spread, and Steve Bryant, the creator of the 1930's adventure series Athena Voltaire, decided to give it a try. Although the Eisner-nominated series already had an established fan base, Bryant said the opportunity to earn the money up front was too enticing to pass up.

"Most independent comics work is paid on the back end, if the book even turns a profit at all," Bryant explained. "This leads to creators producing their book in their downtime and scrambling to make the deadlines.

"With Kickstarter, I can pay myself and [co-creator] Jason Millet both a page rate," he said. "Nothing extravagant, but enough so that we can each allot the time to work on Athena Voltaire to the exclusion of everything else ó and that makes a big difference. Any creator would gladly take one eight-hour block of time over eight one-hour blocks to work on a book."

Bryant listed the comic with a $7,000 goal and a deadline of May 25th to raise the money. The comic has already attracted more than 100 backers and $7,340. If enough is raised, Bryant plans to not only publish the two issues he originally planned, but an additional Athena Voltaire one-shot.

How does it work?

On Kickstarter, a creator sets up a Kickstarter page to raise a set dollar amount for a specific goal, like publishing an issue or a mini-series. People donate as little or as much as they want, using a credit card and Amazon's secure payment system, and their card isn't charged until the deadline and goal are met.

In exchange for pledging money, fans get incentives. For example, Gerads and Dillon offered $10-level supporters a signed comic with an exclusive cover, while one $500-level supporter got the chance to design an alien race that will appear in Johnny Recon.

"The biggest hurdle with Kickstarter is trying to inform your customer not only about your product, but you also have to explain Kickstarter to them," Gerads said. "Face it Ė we're all afraid of new concepts on the internet that we have to send money to. Scott and I always tried to boil it down to its core essence. For example, Kickstarter was our way for people to pre-order Johnny Recon #2. We tried to keep it that simple. We also stressed that all the money is handled by Amazon.com, which helped with that 'trust' factor."

While most comics on Kickstarter are looking for help getting published, different creators approach the website in different ways. For example, Kody Chamberlain decided to utilize the website to cover marketing costs for his comic. Sweets, which will be released through Image Comics in July, will be published whether or not he gets Kickstarter funding.

"If your Kickstarter goal isn't met, the project isn't funded. For some creators, that might mean the book never comes out. But in my case, Sweets was going to be published no matter what," Chamberlain said, explaining that he already has enough money saved to fund the project. "I'm working five months with no income. That's not easy to do. But my savings are enough to cover the bills. The piece of the puzzle I was missing was marketing and promotion funds ó things like posters, flyers, conventions, banner ads, etc. That was out of my budget, so I used Kickstarter to fill in the gaps."

So far, it looks like Chamberlain will have the money to market Sweets successfully. "I hit my goal of $3,000 in under 36 hours," he said. With four days to go until his deadline, he's up to $3,973.

Advice on using Kickstarter

Creators who have used Kickstarter successfully said it has to be approached as a professional endeavor, or supporters won't take the project seriously.

"Kickstarter is a phenomenal tool, but like all tools, you have to know how to use it effectively," Gerads said. "You have to remain professional at all times. Sell, but don't be pushy. Most of all, even though your project is on the site, you have to get out there and point people to it ... effectively."

Bryant said it's also important to offer incentives that seem worth the money. "I don't expect anyone to fund my labor-of-love based on a sob story," Bryant said. "That's why it was important that our Kickstarter campaign provided value in terms of the incentives. No PBS tote bags here!"

Chamberlain pointed out the importance of creating a professional Kickstarter page that communicates why the project is different enough to support.

"If anyone is looking to create a Kickstarter project for a new comic, my
advice would be to tap into what makes your book unique and spend extra
time crafting a solid Kickstarter page," Chamberlain added. "Make sure your video and audio are clean and you offer some genuine content, not just a sales pitch. That's the most common problem I see, many Kickstarter pages have no substance.
Content is king. My secret weapon is that I included lots of behind the scenes video and artwork, and theonly place to see it was on Kickstarter. That was intentional and it seems to have worked for the project."

The creators were all positive about their experience using Kickstarter, and while the small atmosphere at the site has its plusses, they hope other comic book creators take advantage it.

"Looking beyond my own personal experience with it," Bryant said, "I hope Kickstarter will make it possible for a lot of creators to return to their own labor-of-love projects."

Besides, as Dillon pointed out, it's not just about the money. One of the benefits of using Kickstarter is receiving a level of encouragement and incentive that's hard to find elsewhere. "The site has an incredibly welcoming and helpful community that recognizes hard work and creative talent," he said. "I donít think either of us could have foreseen the level of artistic inspiration the process would instill in both of us. Each backer that pledged to support us helped us believe a little bit more that all of the hard work was worth it.

"At the end of the day," Dillon said, "Iím really pleased that we went through Kickstarter. And I would encourage anyone considering it to take the leap of faith. Itís worth it."
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kacangpool
Posted: Aug 28 2010, 11:56 PM


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originally posted by kaze in the webcomic development section:

MAKE COMICS FOR MARK MILLAR'S "CLINT"
by Kiel Phegley

Mark Millar knows his audience.

user posted image
Millar's "Kick-Ass" is one of the anchor strips for "CLiNT"

Aside from being one the biggest hype men in comics, the Scottish writer has earned a rep for bombastic and over the top action tales like "Kick-Ass" and the currently running "Nemesis," all of which give the core superhero audience what they're looking for. But with his latest project - the monthly UK comics magazine "CLiNT" going on sale September 2 in Britain - Millar has set his sights on turning non-comics readers in his native land onto the form again. While his big pitch for the anthology series involves serializing his own properties and signing on big time British television talent to anchor the effort, the writer is also looking to let his already dedicated audience scratch their itch to become comic creators.

"I'm hoping 'CLiNT' hits the British mainstream in a big way," Millar told CBR News of his intended readership. "It's been years since anyone tried a really wide, new launch in the UK and I feel there's an enormous gap in the market for something like this. In the last 100 years, boys comics have been massive in the UK, and it's partly because we have a unique distribution system in this country where we have newsstands within walking distance of most homes. Most people are a five minute walk away from a magazine retailer, unlike the United Stateswhere you often have to get into a car to go buy one. For children, that's especially attractive, and what I wanted to do was create a comics mag again, because for the last 25 years, there really hasn't been a massive amount of work available for UK creators, the cream of the talent head-hunted by Marvel and DC."

Filling that gap in British comics talent is a large part of the mission-statement for "CLiNT," as Millar noted how much the country's comics industry once was able to bank on homegrown creators. "All the guys who worked in the '50s and '60s were replaced by a brilliant wave of creators in the '70s and '80s like John Wagner, Alan Grant, Pat Mills, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, Brian Bolland, Dave Gibbons and so on, but the downside of the success - and these comics sold like crazy over here - was that the big American companies came in and snatched away many of our best guys. This meant that the talent pool was depleted enormously in the '90s and sales on the comics either collapsed to a fraction of what they were or the comics just disappeared. The guys doing books like '2000AD' right now are doing a great job, but the collapse of the market twenty years ago when the brain-drain happened made supermarkets and newsagents forget about boys comics. We were a victim of our own success in the sense that the creators often went to America and got paid more for their work, receiving wider recognition, but an industry that had been thriving here for generations has now been limping along for two or three decades. There just isn't nearly enough work in this country for an enormous number of talented people who are looking for a showcase. Even '2000AD,' probably the greatest British comic of all time, is only selling about 10 or 20 percent of what it used to hit. I want to give people a place they can work here without going to the States. I want to try and rebuild the UK scene with an entirely new business model from what's been tried in the past and get the supermarkets (where 70% of todays sales are) excited about comics. I'm going after a whole new audience here, people who've never been in a comic book store before. I'd like to create a whole new generation of British fans who will hopefully love this stuff and then try comic stores as they become more addicted. Like most people, I started as a newsstand reader too, and I want boys today to do the same."

To that effect, aside from including his own serials like "Kick-Ass 2" and the upcoming "Superior" as well as UK celebrity series like Jonathan Ross' "Turf" with Tommy Lee Edwards, "CLiNT" is embarking on a new open submissions process for aspiring talent wishing to break into British comics. "What I also want to do is find all that new talent in the comics industry. There must be another Alan Moore or Dave Gibbons out there for this generation, but he's working in his day-job and doesn't know where to pitch," Millar said. "It'd be nice if they were British, but they wouldn't have to be. There's great talent in the States and beyond we're already using in the first few issues. What I'd like is to see submissions from people - they can post their work on my Millarworld site. I'm editing this as a part time job. My full time gig is my comics stuff and my movie stuff, so I don't have time to read script submissions or work at developing artists. What I'm asking is for people to create three, four or five-page stories in the style of 'The Twilight Zone' and showcase their talents in an easier and faster way for me to look at. That's why I created the 'Space Oddities' format, similar to what '2000AD' did years ago with "Future Shocks'. This was a wonderful training ground for new writers, I started there myself. Alan Moore started there. Peter Milligan, Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison and all these guys started on 'Future Shocks' and graduated onto bigger things once they proved they could tell a story.

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Jonathan Ross and Tommy Lee Edwards' "Turf" will be serialized in "CLiNT"

"What I propose is writers getting together with artists - and you can find them on Millarworld's creative forum if you don't meet any somewhere else - and submit one of your story ideas. If it's good, we'll buy it. It's only five pages or so - not a massive commitment on anyone's part and worth doing if you're serious about being seen. It might not be bought, but if you're serious about creating comics, you'll do what everyone else does, which is work for free on an art and story sample and see how it goes. Post the story up on my website, and if the writing is better than the art or the art better than the writing, we'll pair you up with someone else. So be prepared that whoever you pitch with might not be the person you're collaborating with, because you might be stronger than they are. We're just going to pick the best ones to run in the magazine, not as a competition but just to find new talent."

Millar points creators with stories ready to submit to this thread on his Millarworld Forums.

"We've bought five already," the writer went on. "I'm going to make sure there are four or five pages in every issue that features new talent, and if somebody is consistently good the first year, in the second year they can get a regular series in the book. The book at the moment is a combination of reprints of American stuff (which the UK mainstream has never seen) and original material, but we'd like to get it in the second year to be at least two-thirds original material. Although, things like 'Turf' or 'Nemesis' or 'Superior' that I run in the first year are going to be new to people, because I'm not going after regular comic fans. This is for people who don't go into comic stores, you have to remember."

Aside from the previously mentioned "Kick-Ass" sequel and Millar and Ross' other strips, "CLiNT" will launch with the new series "Rex Royd" by British comedian Frankie Boyle. "It's like a really like a fucked up version of Lex Luthor," the writer told CBR, noting that the other major piece of the magazine puzzle was building up new star characters to anchor ongoing stories. "We're also looking for a new iconic character who can get his own strip outside the short stories, so what I'd suggest for anyone who fancies it is to write the first 11-page episode of what they'd like to be a continuing series, and again, link up with an artist. If there's anything good enough, we'll buy it and use it. Try to think in terms of a 33-page story, but give us the first 11. If it's good, we'll buy it. It's that simple. But it has to be a real iconic character in the way that Kick-Ass is iconic or Judge Dredd is iconic. It's got to be a good title and a good vision of a lead character. Post your ideas here."

Millar went on to say that while most of his new works will also see their solo issues printed and sold in comic shops via Marvel's Icon imprint and other publishers he works with, attracting bigger media talent like chat show host and avid comics fan Ross was key to locking up distribution in the UK. "I thought long and hard about the launch of this book and came up with a plan for Titan Books. We needed new writers and artists and characters and so on, but in a market where you're competing with literally hundreds of different magazines you need recognizable names, too. 'Kick-Ass 2' goes some way towards that as the character has permeated the mainstream with the movie and we're doing half a million flyers for the comic in the DVD case. It's the first place you can get to see the sequel, for example, if you enjoyed the DVD. But we also have an enormous advantage in that two friends of mine wanted to write comics and were good enough to lend their time to the magazine itself with 'Turf' and 'Rex Royd', both planning other strips as the months progress. Jonathan Ross and Frankie Boyle are about as big as you get in terms of UK name recognition, and having their work in here is an incredible advantage when talking to distributors for Tesco and ASDA (our version of Wal-Mart). Jonathan is like our David Letterman and our Roger Ebert rolled into one. He's the biggest chat show guy, the biggest movie review guy, and he's got a radio show as well. He's our Howard Stern too! So he's probably Britain's top celebrity, and Jonathan writing a strip is a huge deal. Frankie Boyle is the country's biggest standup comedian. I can't tell you how big he is right now - he's just colossal. So to have those two doing this magazine in the same month that we launch the 'Kick-Ass' DVD is about as big a launch pad as you could get."

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"Superior" will join the "CLiNT" family of stories

So far, the writer reports that his plan seems to be working. "The buyers just went crazy for it. They couldn't give a damn about me or any of the guys that draw comics because they're not fans like we are. But they loved 'Turf' and 'Rex Royd' and got excited when they saw the talent involved, realizing this is going to hit big with 16-24 year old guys in particular. The mix in the mag is really good, all very mainstream and fun with vampires and superheroes and robots and so on. It's exactly the kind of thing you'd like if you liked the 'Kick-Ass' movie, and we have so many other tricks up our sleeves. I want this to be as valid a purchase for someone as 'FHM' or whatever. Just something to read on the train or the school common room. It's for people who don't know their 'Infinity Gauntlet' from their 'Crisis On Infinite Earths' - newbies, I guess, but newbies is what comics needs right now because it's where we all started. It's great having graphic novel sections in bookstores for people who can drop ten or fifteen quid to try something out, but we need to get down in the trenches too. This is 100 pages of magazine with 70 pages of comics every month, plus features, for 3.99 [$6.99 U.S.]"

Published through Titan Magazines, "CLiNT" will be available both in the UK and the U.S., including via subscription. Fitting his plans for the monthly into the magazine newsstand distribution system has meant a steep learning curve for Millar, however. "What's interesting is that in the U.S. in comic book stores, books can ship a week late or two weeks late...or in my case, sometimes three months," laughed the writer. "But if you try any of that in the UK newsstands, you're dead because you have to book the shelf space six months ahead of time. So six months ago, we knew the release date for the first issue was going to be September 2, 2010. It's just got to be, otherwise we'll get charged thousands and thousands of pounds. So it's September 2, and every four weeks after that."

For curious comics fans who may already be buying or have bought some of the comics material in "CLiNT," filling out the magazine each month is a series of text features crafted to suit Millar's sensibilities and interests. "I originally sat down and thought, 'This is going to be easy! I'll just sit down and put together a bunch of comic strips I like and put together a bunch of features I like' - because it's going to be about 1/5th text features - 'It'll be so easy, and we'll just sit back and smile and read it once a month.' What I forgot is that nearly every creative person is eternally late and coordination has been an absolute nightmare [Laughs]. I'm just now seeing it from the other side - how horrific it must have been for every editor we've worked for over the years [Laughs]. You're just sitting there waiting on this stuff and looking for constant updates on it all. It's absolutely horrible, but at the same time I'm absolutely loving it. Somehow it just always comes together at the last possible moment, mainly down to the good people at Titan.

"I've got a team of seven feature writers, and they're going to be writing about 15-18-pages of each issue. Fun stuff, like interviews and stuff that reads like 'Esquire' or 'Bizarre' or whatever. It's stuff that people like me and you are interested in. It's more mainstream than 'Wizard,' but at the same time it's full of geekiness in some form. The first issue, for example, has a feature on the Chinese Tom Cruise and the Indian Angelina Jolie, the people who dub the voices for those actors in other countries. So anytime you hear Tom Cruise in a movie in China, it's always the same actor because they have to have the same voice. It's got to be consistent. There's one feature on who Charles Manson was going to kill next after Sharon Tate. He had a whole death list, running through Frank Sinatra and Doris Day and Dean Martin and everyone. So it's a feature on the secret Hollywood death list in the same magazine as 'Nemesis' and 'Turf' and 'Kick-Ass 2.'"



"CLiNT ships to UK news agents on Sept 2 and to U.S. comic shops later in the month. To submit comic strips for the "Space Oddities" feature, go http://forums.millarworld.tv/index.php?showtopic=94575, and to submit an ongoing feature idea, go http://forums.millarworld.tv/index.php?showtopic=94576.

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=27924
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kacangpool
Posted: Jul 22 2011, 03:16 PM


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SDCC í11 | First Comics taking submissions

As we learned earlier this month, First Comics is back in action, and they held a panel Thursday in San Diego to discuss several of their new projects, which include new material and reprints of older material (like some of Bill Willinghamís early work from Warp).

After the panel, Larry Young, their new director of production, shared one tidbit with me ó Susannah Carson, Firstís young adult editor, is also the submissions editor for the company. To submit material, creators can email her at submissions.firstcomics@gmail.com.

http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2011/...ng-submissions/
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kacangpool
Posted: Jul 27 2011, 08:08 AM


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CCI: IS THE COMIC BOOK DOOMED?
by Tom Gastall

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"X-Men" #1 may have sold 7 million copies upon its release, but the industry has changed significantly since those days

Is the 32-page, stapled, monthly serial comic book on its way to extinction? What might force "floppies" out of existence, or return them to their former glory? And if the monthly comic disappears, what does that mean for the future of the comics industry, or the medium itself? The "Is the Comic Book Doomed?" panel at Comic-Con International in San Diego last Saturday set out to answer some of these questions this past Saturday.

Douglas Wolk, author of "Reading Comics: How Graphic Novels Work and What They Mean," introduced the panel to the crowd, consisting of Cartoon Books' Vijaya Iyer, Comics Alliance's Editor-in-Chief Laura Hudson, ComicsPRO's Executive Director Amanda Emmert and "Daredevil" writer and former Chief Creative Officer of BOOM! Studios Mark Waid.

Wolk started off the conversation by asking the panel what they thought of the current state of the 32-page, stapled, monthly serial comic book. Emmert replied that print sales were picking back up this year, an improvement from the past few years, but Hudson noted that ICv2 recently reported that serial sales fell 8% in 2011.

Iyer answered that when she and husband Jeff Smith launched "Bone" in 1991, the highest selling comic ("X-Men" #1) sold 7.1 million copies, while today's highest seller sells less than 100,000 copies, a sobering shift.

Waid asked Emmert about the sales figures she was citing and how much of those sales were specifically attributed to monthly comics, and she replied that there were more factors to consider than the total number of copies sold, two of which being that there was an expansion in "breadth as well as depth," meaning an increase in the total number of titles as well as the total number of copies, and that the comics are being sold by multiple distributors.

Waid commented that people on message boards often point out high sales from previous eras, but forget that the cost of an individual issue was much less expensive than it is today. He then asked Iyer to share the lowest recorded circulation for "Bone," and she answered that the titleís lowest circulation was 2,000 copies, and at that point in time each issue would cost between 30 and 40 cents per unit to print. Waid commented that a black-and-white print run would cost at least twice as much to print now.

While Hudson attempted to reach out for more sales figures via her phone, Waid commented, "Floppies that are sold by Marvel and DC will continue to be healthy for a while longer, because they have deep pockets" (that allow them to print large print runs at a reasonable unit cost), but he would "lose his shirt" were he to self-publish in today's economy, even it he sold 7,000-8,000 copies a month per title.

Wolk asked the panel if it's possible to break even in today's economy, and Emmert said that it was, depending on the context. She went on to explain that whereas "tiers of titles [at Marvel and DC] go down when sales go down" and smaller publishers and breakout hits aren't affected the same way, the real question being whether you can "kill it" and operate at a loss for four or five years.

Waid rebutted there was a better chance of operating at a long-term loss 20 years ago, but Emmert restated her perspective. At this point Hudson again mentioned the IcV2 sales figures, suggesting that the graphic novel sales could offset monthly losses.

Wolk asked the panel at what point selling a monthly pamphlet is no longer feasible. Emmert repeated, "It's a redefinition of terms," adding that the industry need more stores, and the stores needed to "kill it for five years." Hudson noted the growth of graphic novel sales in bookstores, while Emmert pointed out that the tendency of the comic industry to point out its looming death for various reasons every five years, but obviously that death has yet to happen. Iyer said that Cartoon Books will continue to publish as long as there's demand, as their sales subsidize their production.

When the panel was asked for some doomsday scenarios, Iyer replied, "It all depends on numbers."

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Some speculate that in today's market, the self-published books of yesteryear like "Bone" would have a much harder time staying afloat

Emmert cited the sales downturn in the Ď80s, where in publishing "You either stuck it out or left," but now that the larger publishers are part of conglomerates, the "mid-list" of publishers are the ones that have to stick it out. Waid commented that the industry still needs "The Big Two" no matter what, and noted two doomsday scenarios: Marvel buying Diamond, and DC ceasing to publish comics.

Referring to retail, Emmert replied, "We have enough people in the industry to rebound," and that enough stores know how to acquire comics through alternate means (other than Diamond.) Waid noted the sea change in 1995 when Marvel purchased the third largest distributor, Heroís World, and subsequently distributed their comics exclusively through them.

Iyer commented that the "change in equilibrium doesn't mean end times," to which Waid replied, "Maybe there needs to be a crash before there's a renaissance." Emmert said that the "80/20" rule still applies, meaning that 80% of stores will carry the burden of supporting the industry.

Hudson asked the panel what changes they thought needed to happen. Waid replied that it's harder for smaller publishers to publish original intellectual property, and that he wasn't sure that you could launch a book like "Chew" today.

Wolk asked at what point is it unsustainable to continue publishing, and Emmert suggested "creation cost" as a possible factor. Waid disagreed with this idea.

Turning to Iyer, Wolk then asked if Cartoon Books could have launched "Bone" in today's economic climate, and she answered that they could not launch "Bone" using the same model that they used 20 years ago, and that today they would need some sort of digital promotion in addition to perennial sales. Emmert noted that the "Walking Dead trades" sell more today, but the trade sales need to be seeded.

Hudson asked if publishers can use a digital loss leader for trade sales (as opposed to a printed comic as a loss leader), and Emmert believes that it can would for micro-publishers. Waid cited "Penny Arcade" and Warren Ellis' "Freakangels" as comics that utilized successful digital-to-TPB models.

The panel opened for questions, and a fan asked if the panelists thought that digital sales would surpass print sales. Emmert answered that comics needed to be made to fit the digital readers better, and that "sales are 1-2% of where the market is." (Which ICv2 numbers also support.) Hudson noted the continuity hurdle when porting comics content to digital.

When asked about how the digital comics affect the actual comics form, such as the use of the double-page spread, Emmert replied that bigger companies change slower, and there needs to be complimentary approaches in terms of form and distribution.
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kacangpool
Posted: Aug 30 2011, 02:04 PM


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MTV Comics And Stan Lee Launch 'The Seekers' Contest!

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UPDATE: The contest submission deadline has been extended to September 23rd. We've had an incredible response thus far and have gotten numerous requests to keep the contest running. Since the timing still allows for us to narrow the field and run voting prior to New York Comic Con we are going to keep submissions open for as long as possible. For anyone who has already submitted and would like to revise your work based on the new deadline please simply upload a new pdf when you're ready, we'll only look at your most recent entry. Best of luck to everyone!

Have you ever dreamed of writing or illustrating a comic under the tutelage of the legendary Stan Lee? Well, here's your chance True Believer! MTV Comics and POW! Entertainment are offering you the chance to write or illustrate the digital graphic novel "The Seekers!"

Over the next 3 weeks we'll be accepting submissions from artists and writers for an opportunity to earn approximately $10,000.00 to do just that. You read that right, that's 10-Gs.

In order to enter you'll need to read the complete set of official rules, but here are the highlights of the contest:

● Submissions will be close on September 23, 2011
● ARTISTS will submit five (5) black and white pages of sequential comic art based on a scene from "The Seekers"
● WRITERS will write ten (10) pages of comic script and a two (2) page treatment for the series based on Stan's treatment
● Submissions will be narrowed down by the MTV Comics editorial staff to the top 20 semi-finalists in each category; that's 20 writers, and 20 artists
● Semi-finalists will be voted on by the public beginning on September 26, 2011
● The top 5 vote-getters in each category will be forwarded on to Stan Lee, who will hand select the winners
● Winners will be presented the opportunity to write or illustrate MTV Comicsí The Seekers (and earn approximately 10k)

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